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Formulated
Exclusively for
NuVerus by
World Renowned
Neurosurgeon
and NuVerus Medical
Chaiman
Dr. Julian Bailes, MD
NuVerus Omega

The Only DHA Enhanced SuperFood supplement you will ever need for healthier brain, eyes and body.

Formultated Exclusively for NuVerus by World Renowned Neurosurgeon and NuVerus Medical Board Charman Dr. Julian Bailes, MD.

Omega-3 fatty acids are essential fatty acids. We need them for our bodies to work normally. Because essential fatty acids (DHA and EPA) are not made in the body we need to get them from our diet. Research shows strong evidence that the omega-3s EPA and DHA can boost heart health and lower triglycerides, and help with rheumatoid arthritis, depression, and many more. Omega-3s also play an important role in reducing inflammation throughout the body, the blood vessels, the joints, and elsewhere. Omega-3 is essential for development and healthy functioning of the brain, eye and heart, for all stages of life, especially children. Omega’s are needed by every member of your family from pregnant and nursing women to infants, children and all adults.

The Power of Black Seed in Omega

NuVerus is the first company to combine essential Omega with the power of the ancient SuperFood Black Seed oil. Black Seed is one of nature’s greatest gifts. Physicians as far back as the 1st century used Black Seed to treat a variety of ailments and sicknesses. The Black Seed oil has a rich composition of more than 100 compounds including essential fatty acids, vitamins, and minerals.

Read more about Black Seed here

More SuperFoods to Enhance your Health

Curcumin or Tumeric It is a powerful antioxidant that has been used for 1000’s of years.

Flax Seed Oil. WebMd reports there is evidence that it may help reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes.

Chia Seed Oil is loaded with nutrients and antioxidants that can have important benefits for your body and brain. This oil is high in Omega-3 Fatty acids

Grape Seed. WebMd reports that there is strong evidence that grape seed extract is beneficial for a number of cardiovascular conditions

Gotu Kola is a rejuvenative herb that can assist the body with nervous disorders, epilepsy, senility and premature aging.

Bacopa has been shown to improve brain cognition and assists with improving memory function

Ingredient Name Ingredient Description Ingredient Picture Ingredient Icon
Omega 3 Fatty Acid

The human body can make most of the types of fats it needs from other fats or raw materials. That isn’t the case for omega-3 fatty acids (also called omega-3 fats and n-3 fats). These are essential fats—the body can’t make them from scratch but must get them from food. Foods high in Omega-3 include fish, vegetable oils, nuts (especially walnuts), flax seeds, flaxseed oil, and leafy vegetables.

What makes omega-3 fats special? They are an integral part of cell membranes throughout the body and affect the function of the cell receptors in these membranes. They provide the starting point for making hormones that regulate blood clotting, contraction and relaxation of artery walls, and inflammation. They also bind to receptors in cells that regulate genetic function. Likely due to these effects, omega-3 fats have been shown to help prevent heart disease and stroke, may help control lupus, eczema, and rheumatoid arthritis, and may play protective roles in cancer and other conditions.

Omega-3 fats are a key family of polyunsaturated fats. There are three main omega-3s:

  • Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) come mainly from fish, so they are sometimes called marine omega-3s.
  • Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the most common omega-3 fatty acid in most Western diets, is found in vegetable oils and nuts (especially walnuts), flax seeds and flaxseed oil, leafy vegetables, and some animal fat, especially in grass-fed animals. The human body generally uses ALA for energy, and conversion into EPA and DHA is very limited.

The strongest evidence for a beneficial effect of omega-3 fats has to do with heart disease. These fats appear to help the heart beat at a steady clip and not veer into a dangerous or potentially fatal erratic rhythm.  Such arrhythmias cause most of the 500,000-plus cardiac deaths that occur each year in the United States. Omega-3 fats also lower blood pressure and heart rate, improve blood vessel function, and, at higher doses, lower triglycerides and may ease inflammation, which plays a role in the development of atherosclerosis.

Several large trials have evaluated the effect of fish or fish oils on heart disease. In the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell’Infarto Miocardio (known as the GISSI Prevention Trial), heart attack survivors who took a 1-gram capsule of omega-3 fats every day for three years were less likely to have a repeat heart attack, stroke, or die of sudden death than those who took a placebo.  Notably, the risk of sudden cardiac death was reduced by about 50 percent. In the more recent Japan EPA Lipid Intervention Study (JELIS), participants who took EPA plus a cholesterol-lowering statin were less likely to have a major coronary event (sudden cardiac death, fatal or nonfatal heart attack, unstable angina, or a procedure to open or bypass a narrowed or blocked coronary artery) than those who took a statin alone.

Most Americans take in far more of another essential fat—omega-6 fats—than they do omega-3 fats. Some experts have raised the hypothesis that this higher intake of omega-6 fats could pose problems, cardiovascular and otherwise, but this has not been supported by evidence in humans.

Given the wide-ranging importance and benefits of marine omega-3 fatty acids, it is important to eat fish or other seafood one to two times per week, particularly fatty (dark meat) fish that are richer in EPA and DHA. This is especially important for women who are pregnant or hoping to become pregnant and nursing mothers. From the third trimester until the second year of life, a developing child needs a steady supply of DHA to form the brain and other parts of the nervous system.

 


 
EPA

Omega-3 fatty acids are found in fatty layers of cold-water fish and shellfish, plant and nut oils, English walnuts, flaxseed, algae oils, and fortified foods. You can also get omega-3s as supplements. Food and supplement sources of these fatty acids differ in the forms and amounts they contain.

There are the two main types of omega-3 fatty acids:

  • Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids are EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). These are plentiful in fish and shellfish. Algae often provides only DHA.
  •  Short-chain omega-3 fatty acids are ALA (alpha-linolenic acid). These are found in plants, such as flaxseed. Though beneficial, ALA omega-3 fatty acids have less potent health benefits than EPA and DHA. You'd have to eat a lot to gain the same benefits as you do from fish.

What Studies Reveal About Omega-3s

In addition to omega-3s, fish is high in protein, vitamins, and minerals. And, it's low in saturated fat. Hundreds of studies suggest that omega-3s may provide some benefits to a wide range of diseases: cancer, asthma, depression, cardiovascular disease, ADHD, and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. How could fatty acids be so beneficial for so many different conditions? All these diseases have a common genesis in inflammation," says Joseph C. Maroon, MD, professor and vice chairman of the department of neurological surgery at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Co-author of Fish Oil: The Natural Anti-Inflammatory, Maroon says that in large enough amounts omega-3's reduce the inflammatory process that leads to many chronic conditions.

 

 

 

   
DHA

DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) is a fatty acid found in the meat of cold-water fish, including mackerel, herring, tuna, halibut, salmon, cod liver, whale blubber, and seal blubber. Don’t confuse DHA with EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid). They are both in fish oil, but they are not the same. DHA can be converted into EPA in the body.

DHA is used as a supplement for premature babies and as an ingredient in baby formula during the first four months of life to promote better mental development. This practice probably started because DHA is found naturally in breast milk. DHA is also used in combination with arachidonic acid during the first four to six months of life for this purpose.

DHA is used for treating type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease (CAD), dementia, and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Some people use DHA is for improving vision, preventing an eye disease called age-related macular degeneration (AMD), preventing and treating depression, and reducing aggressive behavior in people in stressful situations.

DHA is used in combination with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) for a variety of conditions, including the prevention and reversal of heart disease, stabilizing heart rhythm, asthma, cancer, painful menstrual periods, hay fever, lung diseases, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and certain kidney diseases. EPA and DHA are also used in combination for high cholesterol, high blood pressure, psoriasis, Raynaud’s syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, bipolar disorder, certain inflammations of the digestive system (ulcerative colitis) and preventing migraine headaches in teenagers.

How does it work? DHA plays a key role in the development of eye and nerve tissues. DHA may also reduce the risk of heart and circulatory disease by decreasing the thickness of the blood and lowering blood levels of triglycerides.

 
Black Seed Oil

Black Seed (scientific name: Nigella Sativa) is known around the world and throughout history for its restorative and medicinal qualities. Truly Black Seed is one of nature's greatest gifts, and that is probably why it is referred to as the "seed of blessing." The ancient Egyptians and Assyrians recognized the power of this healing herb as early as 3000 years ago. Found in the tomb of Tutankhamen, “King Tut”, Black Seed was thought to help the Pharaohs in the afterlife. Physicians as far back as the 1st century used Black Seed to treat a variety of ailments and sicknesses.

Black Seed grows wild in the Mediterranean but has been cultivated in the Arabian Peninsula, Asia and Africa. It’s oil, which has a rich composition of more than 100 compounds including essential fatty acids, vitamins, and minerals.

Black Seed is remarkable in that it is one of the few natural, herbal remedies that has been studied by the scientific community and found to have tremendous potential benefit. Today, more and more medical scientists and professionals are recognizing the power of this amazing little seed. It was recently recommended as an herbal remedy by the World Health Organization. Research continues to show the positive results of Black Seed, and it continues to generate excitement throughout the medical industry.

Black Seed it not commonly found in liquid nutrition products. NuVerus is the first company we know of to focus on this remarkable SuperFood. The Oil of the Black Seed has a strong pepper flavor, which explains why all the other products on the market have excluded it. NuVerus has used advanced manufacturing techniques to combine the Black Seed Oil in a delicious and comprehensive formula with SuperFoods from around the world.

* The statements on this website have not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA). This product is not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease.

 

   
Curcumin

Curcumin, the principal derivative of the popular Indian spice turmeric, is an herb found naturally in India and southern Asia. For at least four thousand years, it has been touted for its health benefits, and still today it’s used throughout India. Research has shown that Curcumin’ s anti-inflammatory properties may be able to prevent free radical damage at the cellular level.

Curcumin is impressing scientists around the world with its remarkable multiple health benefits. Curcumin is a polyphenol present in the spice turmeric and was first used by Indians over 3,000 years ago in traditional Ayurvedic medicine. Modern science has found that curcumin has remarkable health benefits for nearly every organ system in the body including its ability to inhibit enzymes that help produce inflammation in the body.The antioxidant power and anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric are all thanks to a component called curcumin, which is found in the common spice.

In the Indian Ayurveda system of herbal medicine, turmeric is known as strengthening and warming to the whole body.  Traditional uses in India include to improve digestion, to improve intestinal flora, to eliminate worms, to relieve gas, to cleanse and strengthen the liver and gallbladder, to normalize menstruation, for relief of arthritis and swelling, as a blood purifier, to warm and promote proper metabolism correcting both excesses and deficiencies, for local application on sprains, burns, cuts, bruises, insect bites and itches, for soothing action in cough and asthma, as antibacterial and anti-fungus, and in any condition of weakness or debility.   

Many high quality studies show that it has major benefits for your body and brain.
Recently, science has started to back up what the Indians have known for a long time… it really does contain compounds with medicinal properties


   
Grape Seed

Resveratrol first captured the attention of the world's scientific community (and the general public!) in 2003 when experiments conducted by Dr. David Sinclair at Harvard appeared in the prestigious journal, Nature. Sinclair's pioneering research demonstrated the life extending benefits of Resveratrol in mice, the first experiments performed on mammals.

But the story really dates back to the 1930s when scientists at Cornell University discovered the life-extending effects of calorie restriction, or CR. In animal tests they found that cutting calorie intake by about a third extended life span by 30 percent or more. The animals on the diet remained healthier, longer. It is believed that calorie restriction has the same effect on the human body.
Resveratrol is an extremely potent antioxidant (part of the family called polyphenols) found in certain fruits and vegetables. In nature, the highest concentration is found in grapes.

Many researchers believe that Resveratrol is primarily responsible for what's called "The French Paradox": the observation that the people of France, in general, enjoy good cardiovascular health even though their diet is high in fat.

A 2003 study at Harvard University found that resveratrol mimics the effects of caloric restriction in yeast cells, boosting their life spans by as much as 70%.3 The following year the researchers went on to demonstrate that resveratrol slows aging in two standard laboratory animals, roundworms and fruit flies.4 That made resveratrol the first compound to show anti-aging effects in widely divergent species. Then in 2006, scientists in Pisa, Italy, showed that resveratrol’s magic could be applied to more advanced animals— large doses of resveratrol extended the life span by more than 50% in a species of fish, Nothobranchius furzeri, which typically lives just nine weeks.

In a study published in 2006 in the journal Cell, researchers in France found that resveratrol protects mice against diet-induced insulin resistance and obesity.6 Furthermore, mice given the resveratrol supplement demonstrated improved endurance levels during exercise. The researchers also studied the cell-signaling pathway in the mitochondria of these mice. Mitochondria are the power plants of cells, which are responsible for intracellular energy production. Resveratrol activated a protein in the sirtuin family (SIRT1), which then stimulated the activity of another protein involved in mitochondrial function. Other recent studies, including one conducted at the Joslin Diabetes Center, have found another member of the sirtuin family of cellular proteins that may play a major role in how fat is produced and stored, offering a new target for treatments to prevent obesity and reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes.

The French researchers surmised that resveratrol helped control weight gain by enhancing energy expenditure. Since the study found a link between sirtuins and energy utilization, the researchers concluded that resveratrol may be helpful in the prevention and treatment of certain metabolic disorders, especially those related to mitochondrial dysfunction, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease—two neurodegenerative conditions that become more prevalent with aging.

Resveratrol is usually associated with grapes, but it is also found in other plants such as mulberries and peanuts. Interestingly, resveratrol is produced more abundantly by plants when they fall under some type of environmental attack. When a plant is under stress, the rate of resveratrol production is cranked up with the help of an enzyme called resveratrol synthase.

It is interesting that resveratrol is not found in the flesh of the grape only in the skin. But this explains why red wines contain higher concentrations of resveratrol than white wines or rose wines. The process of making red wine calls for the skins of the grapes to stay in contact longer with the final wine. Also, red wines are subjected to less filtering during winemaking, which limits the loss of resveratrol.

Resveratrol was originally isolated from the root of a flowering herb called hellebore in 1940. However, it didn't attract wide attention until 1992 when its presence in wine was first linked with the heart health benefits of red wine.

  • Resveratrol is the beneficial substance found in red wine. A typical glass of red wine supplies about 1 mg of resveratrol.
  • Resveratrol possesses beneficial antioxidant properties.
  • A lab study found that the combination of resveratrol and quercetin supported cellular health and function.
  • Grape extract contains flavonoid polyphenols, ellagic acid, and resveratrol.
  • Polyphenols possess beneficial antioxidant activity that helps fight cell-damaging free radicals in the body.
 
Gotu kola

Gotu Kola is a rejuvenative nervine recommended for nervous disorders, epilepsy, senility and premature aging. As a brain tonic, it is said to aid intelligence and memory. It strengthens the adrenal glands and cleanses the blood to treat skin impurities. It is said to combat stress and depression, increase libido and improve reflexes. It has also been indicated for chronic venous insufficiency, minor burns, scars, scleroderma, skin ulcers, varicose veins, wound healing, rheumatism, blood diseases, congestive heart failure, urinary tract infections, venereal diseases, hepatitis and high blood pressure.

In India, Gotu kola is regarded as perhaps the most spiritual of all herbs. Growing in some areas of the Himalayas, gotu kola is used by yogis to improve meditation. It is said to develop the crown chakra, the energy center at the top of the head and to balance the right and left hemispheres of the brain, which the leaf is said to resemble. It is regarded as one of the most important rejuvenative herbs in Ayurvedic Medicine. Sri Lankans noticed that elephants, renowned for their longevity, munched on the leaves of the plant. Thus the leaves became known as a promoter of long life. It is said to fortify the immune system, both cleansing and feeding it and to strengthen the adrenals. It has been used as a pure blood tonic and for skin health. It has also been used to promote restful sleep. Gotu kola is often confused with kola nut. Due to this confusion, some people assume the rejuvenating properties of gotu kola are due to the stimulating effects of caffeine contained in kola nut. In fact, gotu kola is not related to kola nut and contains no caffeine.

Gotu Kola is a rejuvenative nervine recommended for nervous disorders, including epilepsy, senility and premature aging. As a brain tonic, it is said to aid intelligence and memory. It strengthens the adrenal glands while cleansing the blood to treat skin impurities. It is said to combat stress and depression, energize flagging mental powers, increase libido, ward off a nervous breakdown and improve reflexes. It energizes the central nervous system and rebuilds energy reserves.

Modern Studies

According to modern studies, gotu kola does offer support for healthy memory function. A study conducted in 1992 by K. Nalini at Kasturba Medical College showed an impressive improvement in memory in rats which were treated with the extract (orally) daily for 14 days before the experiment. The retention of learned behavior in the rats treated with gotu kola was 3 to 60 times better than that in control animals. Preliminary results in one clinical trial with mentally retarded children was shown to increase scores on intelligence tests (Bagchi, 1989). This does not mean gotu kola will improve intelligence for all special or normal children.

According to pharmacological studies, one outcome of gotu kola's complex actions is a balanced effect on cells and tissues participating in the process of healing, particularly connective tissues. One of its constituents, asiaticoside, works to stimulate skin repair and strengthen skin, hair, nails and connective tissue (Kartnig, 1988).

 
Flax Seed Oil

Flaxseed is the seed from the plant Linum usitatissimum. Oil from the seed is used to make medicine.

People try flaxseed oil for many different conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis and high cholesterol. It is also tried for treating osteoarthritis, anxiety, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), vaginal infections, dry eyes, “hardening of the arteries” (atherosclerosis), high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Some people use flaxseed oil as a laxative for constipation, for weight loss, and to prevent breast cancer and prostate cancer.

Flaxseed oil is also applied to the skin to sooth irritations or soften roughness.

In foods, flaxseed oil is used as cooking oil and in margarines.

In manufacturing, flaxseed oil is used as an ingredient in paints, varnishes, linoleum, and soap; and as a waterproofing agent.

How does it work?

Flaxseed oil is a source of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as alpha-linolenic acid. The alpha-linolenic acid and related chemicals in flaxseed oil seem to decrease inflammation. That is why flaxseed oil is thought to be useful for rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory (swelling) diseases


 
Chia Seed Oil

When you hear “chia,” you may think of “Chia Pets.” These are clay figures sold in the US that support the growth of chia sprouts. But chia has a much longer history as a medicinal herb. It originated in Mexico and was cultivated by the Aztecs. Today, chia is grown commercially in Central America and South America. It is grown mainly for its seed, which is a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids.

People use chia seed for diabetes, high blood pressure, and for generally reducing the risk of heart disease and stroke (cardiovascular disease).

How does it work?

Chia seeds contain a large amount of healthy omega-3 fatty acids and dietary fiber. Researchers think omega-3 fatty acids and fiber help reduce risk factors for heart disease.
 
NuVerus Omega Ingredients
* The statements on this website have not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA). This product is not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease.
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NuVerus Omega
Dr. Julian Bailes and Omega 3

Dr. Julian Bailes, M.D. - NuVerus Medical Board & Research Team.

Read more about Dr. Bailes in our Medical Advisory Board Section

“NuVerus products are based on the latest scientific research and formulated with the optimal daily dosages of each ingredient so you can achieve your wellness goals. Unlike other companies who simply throw as many ingredients together as possible, NuVerus treats product formulation as an art form. More than simply taking the ingredients supported by scientific literature, we use them in the proper forms, in the proper combinations and in the proper amounts to truly make an effective product formula.”
- Dr. Julian Bailes, M.D.

Dr. Julian Bailes Begins Using Omega 3 to Save a Brain Damaged Child

A Snippet from a story of hope and survival as printed on cnn.com October 22, 2012.

When Randal McCloy was rushed to West Virginia University Ruby Memorial Hospital’s intensive-care unit he was practically dead.

“As far as we know, he survived the longest exposure to carbon monoxide poisoning,” says Julian Bailes, M.D., the neurosurgeon assigned to the case. McCloy was in a coma and in deep shock.

Even if he somehow managed to pull through, doctors predicted McCloy would be severely brain damaged. “It’s very difficult to come back from a brain injury,” says Dr. Bailes. “There’s no drug that can help that.” 

While McCloy was being given oxygen infusions in a hyperbaric chamber, Dr. Bailes ordered a daily dose of omega-3.

Several weeks passed. Then, unexpectedly, McCloy emerged from his coma. This in itself was amazing, but he wasn’t done. In the weeks that followed, he stunned even the most optimistic experts by recovering his memory and gradually regaining his ability to walk, talk, and see, a turnaround that many in the medical field called miraculous. 

“The omega-3s helped rebuild the damaged gray and white matter of his brain. “I would say he should be on it for a lifetime,” says Dr. Bailes. “But then, I think everybody should.”

- October 22, 2012, cnn.com

Read more about Black Seed here

Why NuVerus Omega

NuVerus Omega differs from other Omega products on the market today. NuVerus Omega uses synergistic ingredients which help maximize the potential of each individual ingredient. Our Omega 3 comes from multiple sources which is then supported by the antioxdant effect of each of those individual sources.

So with NuVerus Omega, you are not only getting the important Omega 3 oils that are vital to your body and mind, but you are also recieving the antioxidants which help the body with inflammation, aging and immune system support.

Dr. Julian Bailes Peer Reviewed Articles and Omega 3

Mills JD, Bailes JE, Guskiewicz KM: Protection for the contact sport athlete: dietary supplementation with the omega-3 FA DHA. J Athlet Training, submitted 2010.

Mills JD, Sedney CL, Shih SR, Bailes JE. Omega-3 dietary supplementation reduces traumatic axonal injury in a rodent head injury model. J Neurosurg. Jan;114(1):77-84. 2011.

Bailes JE, Mills JD, Hadley K. Dietary Supplementation with the Omega-3 Fatty Acid Docosahexaenoic Acid in Traumatic Brain Injury. Neurosurgery, 68(2):474-481. February 2011.

Lewis M, Bailes JE. Neuroprotection for the warrior: dietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids. Military Med 176: 1120-1127, 2011.